17 November 2017

From the Archives - 18 November 2015 - Tiny Blooms - Pink Chrysanthemums



Here is another post in a brand new blog series - called 'From the Archives'. These will be previously posted blog posts that I feel are still relevant for some reason or another. 

It will always be a post from the same calendar month as we are in or it could be some of my favourite flowers from the same season, that still lifts my spirit. 

Flowers are so ephemeral - but their beauty caught on camera never fades.........!!


This series of blog posts - called 'Tiny Blooms - are about small flower arrangements. Small - might be the size of the container or it could be the size of the flowers or the amount of stems in each container. It can also be that the arrangement is minimal both in presentation and that it's simple, quick and easy to do. Apart from that there are no other strict rules - I'm allowing myself a lot of creative freedom!


Chrysanthemums, pink and vintage bottles - some of my favorite things!

I found some pink spray Chrysanthemums - 'spray' just means that they are multi-stemmed - and I cut some stems down to their single flowers. 

My daughter and I spent a few hours at the Country Living magazine Christmas Fair last week. There are some lovely stalls that I go back to every year. On one antique stall I found these adorable mini vintage bottles - bought five and I had an instant little collection.


Combining the two makes a charming display - the bottles are only just over 11 cm tall - so they are perfect for one or two stems.

To photograph them I have displayed them on an old French linen tablecloth - but a small collection like this works very well on a little tray - keeping them together gives them more impact.

Chrysanthemums are available all year around but are particularly welcome at this time of year when cheep flowers are sparse on the ground. Here in London its raining, its dark early and very windy. Well, the pink colour reminds me of spring!!

[Styling and Photography: © Ingrid Henningsson/Of Spring and Summer.]



15 November 2017

Florets - Floral Quote - # 159 - by Hans Blomquist



'Florets - Floral Quote' is a series of blog posts where I feature quotes by authors - mostly well known - but you will also find some obscure ones.

All of them have written one or several books about flowers, green plants, gardening, interior styling or interior design. Many are experts in their field but what is the most important is that they are all passionate about flowers and plants.

I love books and in my ever growing library I look for quotes that I hope will be both inspiring and be useful while arranging flowers or green plants in your home.


"In my opinion, you can't go wrong when bringing any kind of branch, stick or dried grasses into your home as a natural decoration for any setting, and the fact that they will last almost forever is a bonus. In winter, I love to bring in bare branches, large or small, and in spring and summer it is either branches laden with blossoms or lush green leaves. One of my favourites are, of course, olive branches, which still look so beautiful when they have dried out. In autumn, there are many different kinds of berries that look striking and add a splash of colour." 
~ Hans Blomquist ~  



[Hans BlomquistSwedish, Paris based art director, interior stylist, photographer and author of three books.]

[Quote from: In Detail 2014, published by Ryland Peters and Small.]

[Plant: Contorted willow.]
[Styling and Photography © Ingrid Henningsson/Of Spring and Summer.]


13 November 2017

Columbia Road Flower Market in East London


Every Sunday for the last 150 years there's been a flower market at Columbia Road in east London.
Have look at this short video and make sure you visit it on a Sunday morning when you are in London. It's a great experience and lots of fun!

Also have a look at this page on The Joy of Plants were they will give you a lot of background about the market.

[Video: The Joy of Plants]

10 November 2017

From the Archives - 24 November 2014 - Take 3 Flowers!


This is the second post in a brand new blog series - called 'From the Archives'. It will be previously posted blog posts that I feel are still relevant for some reason or another. 

It will always be a post from the same calendar month as we are in or it could be some of my favourite flowers from the same season - that still lifts my spirit. 

Flowers are so ephemeral - but their beauty caught on camera never fades.........!!



I'm back with another blog post in the series 'Take 3 Flowers!' - where I will show you how to make easy but beautiful and stylish flower arrangements - just using three different flowers. Often one of the three will be some kind of foliage.

Using just three flowers will sometimes be a challenge - but it will also keep the cost down. Cut flowers can be expensive but foliage on the other hand tends to be cheep. You can use lots of it to help fill out the arrangement and to provide support and structure for the other flowers.

Using flowers in closely related colours and then finding a vase or container in a similar colour can be a challenge - but boy what a pleasure when it works!

I love using Eucalyptus as foliage at this time of year and like here combined with a beautifully coloured Hydrangea and some dramatic dark berries - you don't need to add anything else. 

You'll need: 

- 1 stem of Hydrangea in a dark blue or purple colour - with a large flower head
-  5 stems of Viburnum berries
-  7 stems of small leaved Eucalyptus foliage - there is one called 'Baby Blue' that has small roundish leaves
- a large vase or container - in this case I have used a tall grey French vintage enamelled water jug



Here in the UK you can still buy Hydrangeas - mind you they are quite expensive - so I just picked one stem with a very large head in gorgeous green, purple and blue colours. 


A few stems of Viburnum, with dark blue almost black berries, will go a long way and I love the little red stems.



Eucalyptus is such an useful foliage, so I'm using it again - but this time one with a different size leaves - small and round. 

For conditioning the flowers - you'll also need:

- florists snippers or scissors
- a florist bucket

As always - condition the flowers by removing any leaves that would end up below the water line in the vase. Cut the stems at an angle - to increase water absorption. Put in a clean container with tepid water and leave in a cool, dark place over night or at least for a few hours before making the final arrangement.

Sorry, about always repeating this last bit - but it's probably the most important thing you can do to make your flowers last longer! So I'm afraid you have to put up with me always repeating myself.



Pick a large container in a colour relating to the flowers. Start off with the Hydrangea. It will have a woody stem so you will need to split the stem by making a second cut up the stem. Place it towards the front - resting on the edge of the container. 

The Viburnum berries will also have woody stems - so make that second cut up the stem on those as well. Place the berries behind the Hydrangea - a little bit taller than the Hydrangea - kind of framing the big flower. 

Lastly - trim and split the stems on the Eucalyptus, if the stems are thick and woody, and place them behind the dark berries - just kind of sticking up at the back and the sides - giving the whole arrangement a bit of movement. 


Some colouring pencils in relating colours - in a vintage pewter jar


It's such a pleasure to be able to work with beautiful plant materials and the beauty of Hydrangeas never ceases to amaze me and it will probably always be one of my favourite flowers.



~ xoxo ~

Ingrid


[Styling and photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]

8 November 2017

Florets - Floral Quote - # 158 - by Igor Josifovic and Judith De Graaff


'Florets - Floral Quote' is a series of blog posts where I feature quotes by authors - mostly well known - but you will also find some obscure ones.

All of them have written one or several books about flowers, green plants, gardening, interior styling or interior design. Many are experts in their field but what is the most important is that they are all passionate about flowers and plants.

I love books and in my ever growing library I look for quotes that I hope will be both inspiring and be useful while arranging flowers or green plants in your home.


"It's very understandable: when we buy a new plant we're excited and want to take good care of our new plant friend. We lavish it with care and attention, and give it a drink of water every day. But most plants only need to be watered once or twice a week - and some much less often. Our overeagerness turns out to be a fatal mistake, and the new plant bites the dust. As a side note, a tip: the finger test is always good. If the upper layer of soil is dry, you can water the plant again."
~ Igor Josifovic and Judith de Graaff ~ 

[Igor Josifovic: blogger, social media expert, plant lover, co-founder of Urban Jungle Bloggers and co-author of Urban Jungle (2016)]

[Judith de Graaff: blogger, graphic designer, plant lover, co-founder of Urban Jungle Bloggers and co-author of Urban Jungle.]



[Quote from: Urban Jungle by Igor Josifovic and Judith de Graaff. Published by Callway.]

[Houseplant: Schlumbergia.]

[Styling and Photography © Ingrid Henningsson/Of Spring and Summer.]


6 November 2017

Autumn Table Wreath by Sarah Raven


Today on Floral Media I'm wanted to show you this real showstopper autumn table wreath by Sarah Raven. She has used many of my favourite colours that are around at this time of year.

I featured this video back in 2014 - but I like it so much I thought it deserves a second viewing - same video but I've written all new text this time. Enjoy!



Sarah's choice of plants are an unusual mix of scented pelargonium foliage, hydrangea flowers and seed heads, hawthorn berries and Chinese lanterns. There are also some unusual little surprises such as ornamental cucumbers and strawberry popcorn. 

In the middle are five flame coloured candles picking up all the colours in the wreath. Sarah has used an oasis base so both spent flowers and candles can be replaced which means that the whole centerpiece will last well into the holiday season. 


3 November 2017

From the Archives - 3 November 2014 - Ornamental Cabbage


A blogpost from deep in the archives - posted last time also on 3 November - still just as relevant as it's seasonal and one of my favourite autumn flowers/plants.

It was also the beginning of a new and very popular blog series called 'Tiny Blooms'.  


***** 

I'm starting another blog series or column - that I'm calling 'Tiny Blooms' and it will be about small arrangements. Small or tiny might be the size of the container or it could be the size of the flowers or the amount of stems in each container. It will also be that the arrangement is minimal both in presentation and that it's quick and easy to do. Apart from that there are no other strict rules - I'm allowing myself some creative freedom here!



In this the first 'Tiny Blooms' - I'm diving straight in and almost breaking some of the rules. 

I'm using some rather long-stemmed ornamental cabbage - you should have seen them before I got hold of them, they were twice as tall - BUT there are only three of them.

I have also reduced the flower head taking off the greener outer leaves and just leaving the really stunningly colourful ones in the centre. I also love the amazing colour on the stems and wanted to show part of them.




So after conditioning the flowers - I reduced the heads by taking off a lot of the lower leaves - I trimmed the stems so that they are in proportion to the container - and in this case allowing for some of the beautiful stems to show - rather then having the flower heads rest on the edge of the container - as you probably normally would do.

I tried to tie some purple raffia around the stems - to hold the three stems together - but in the end decided that it didn't work - the heads looked too squashed together - instead I just let the three stems lean to one side. I didn't want a stiff arrangement and as I said before I wanted to show the stems. 

I changed from purple raffia to black twine and tied some around the neck of the cream ware container - just with a double knot and leaving the ends to casually hang down. 

Voilà - a seasonal, quick and easy arrangement - using some colourful 'tiny blooms'.


  Have a Lovely Floral Day!

~ xoxo ~

Ingrid 

[Styling and Photography © Ingrid Henningsson for Of Spring and Summer.]